Editorial – September 2013

An inclusive Christian community in Auckland, New Zealand

Editorial – September 2013

Global Warming and its consequences
I recently watched a disturbing documentary film on Maori Television, which in my mind left little room for complacency.
It is of particular concern to us here in the South Pacific, which is home to many ethnic communities on low lying atolls.  Some of these are already experiencing encroachment from the sea.  According to predictions supported by scientific evidence, up to 200 million people may be affected worldwide by the middle of this century, with a substantial proportion in the Asia-Pacific region.
It can be reasonably assumed that Australia and New Zealand, considered to be grossly under populated, will be considered first in line regionally to accommodate substantial numbers of displace refugees with consequential extra-ordinary demands on infrastructure, housing and other necessities of life.
Argument still abounds about the time it will take and the full consequences of global warming, but there is little doubt about it eventually happening unless we can stop the relentless search for and consumption of fossil fuel to maintain our lifestyle.  Many commentators insist that it is already too late to make amends and are able to support their reasoning with the added concerns about pollution at an ever increasing rate.
Most of us older folk can shrug this off with an assertion that whatever is going to happen, will not affect us as we will be long gone.  But consider what kind of legacy we are leaving for our grandchildren, who, if the predictions are true, will have to bear the brunt of the developing catastrophe.  Righteous fundamentalist Christians will point to Holy Scripture in anticipation of what is written, and is seen as God’s judgement on us for our inequities in failing to obey His law.  It cannot denied that true believers share a strong sense of responsibility that seems to have made no impression on the majority of consumers, who have little regards in their consumption and behaviour pattern for the environment and their fellow human beings.
The same can be said for our disposal of refuse.  A telling news item on TV3 this Wednesday dispelled the 100% Pure myth once and for all and puts us at a par with the practices in less developed economies.
I am inclined to agree with the doom-sayers, who maintain that the continuing deterioration in our living environment is too far gone to put a stop to it unless humanity is prepared to make drastic sacrifices in our life style.  This is unlikely to happen if we add the exploitative and polluting practices in most developing countries.  In these terms we, the responsible generation, are leaving a terrible legacy for our descendants.  May God forgive us.
Ralph